Court Acknowledges Lack of Expertise to Recommend Search Methodology, Orders Parties to Confer: eDiscovery Case Law

By : Doug Austin

In ACI Worldwide Corp. v. MasterCard Technologies, LLC and MasterCard International, Inc., Nebraska Magistrate Judge F.A. Gossett, acknowledging that the Court “simply does not have the expertise necessary to determine the best methodology to be employed in retrieving the requested materials in a safe, non-obtrusive, and cost-effective manner”, ordered the parties to “once again” confer in an effort to reach an agreement regarding the search methodology to be employed by the defendants in retrieving the information requested by the plaintiff.

Here are a Few Common Myths About Technology Assisted Review: eDiscovery Best Practices

By : Doug Austin

A couple of years ago, after my annual LegalTech New York interviews with various eDiscovery thought leaders, I wrote a post about some of the perceived myths that exist regarding Technology Assisted Review (TAR) and what it means to the review process. After a recent discussion with a client where their misperceptions regarding TAR were evident, it seemed appropriate to revisit this topic and debunk a few myths that others may believe as well.

Keyword Searching Isn’t Dead, If It’s Done Correctly: eDiscovery Best Practices

By : Doug Austin

In the latest post of the Advanced Discovery blog, Tom O’Connor (who is an industry thought leader and has been a thought leader interviewee on this blog several times) posed an interesting question: Is Keyword Searching Dead?

Pitfalls Associated with Self-Collection of Data by Custodians: eDiscovery Best Practices

By : Doug Austin

Last week, we covered the Burd v. Ford Motor Co. case where the court granted the plaintiff’s motion for a deposition of a Rule 30(b)(6) witness on the defendant’s search and collection methodology involving self-collection of responsive documents by custodians based on search instructions provided by counsel. In light of that case and a recent client experience of mine, I thought it would be appropriate to revisit this topic that we addressed a couple of years ago.

“Da Silva Moore Revisited” Will Be Visited by a Newly Appointed Special Master: eDiscovery Case Law

By : Doug Austin

In Rio Tinto Plc v. Vale S.A., New York Magistrate Judge Andrew J. Peck, at the request of the defendant, entered an Order appointing Maura Grossman as a special master in this case to assist with issues concerning Technology-Assisted Review (TAR).

“Quality is Job 1″ at Ford, Except When it Comes to Self-Collection of Documents: eDiscovery Case Law

By : Doug Austin

In Burd v. Ford Motor Co., West Virginia Magistrate Judge Cheryl A. Eifert granted the plaintiff’s motion for a deposition of a Rule 30(b)(6) witness on the defendant’s search and collection methodology, but did not rule on the issue of whether the defendant had a reasonable collection process or adequate production, denying the plaintiff’s motion as “premature” on that request.

This Study Discusses the Benefits of Including Metadata in Machine Learning for TAR: eDiscovery Trends

By : Doug Austin

A month ago, we discussed the Discovery of Electronically Stored Information (DESI) workshop and the papers describing research or practice presented at the workshop that was held earlier this month and we covered one of those papers a couple of weeks later. Today, let’s cover another paper from the study.

Here’s One Study That Shows Potential Savings from Technology Assisted Review: eDiscovery Trends

By : Doug Austin

A couple of weeks ago, we discussed the Discovery of Electronically Stored Information (DESI) workshop and the papers describing research or practice presented at the workshop that was held earlier this month. Today, let’s cover one of those papers.

Plaintiff Ordered to Image its Sources of ESI, Respond to Disputed Discovery Requests: eDiscovery Case Law

By : Doug Austin

In Electrified Discounters, Inc. v. MI Technologies, Inc. et al., Connecticut Magistrate Judge Donna F. Martinez granted the defendant’s motion to compel the plaintiff 's responses to discovery and ordered the plaintiff to “image its sources of electronically stored information (‘ESI’), including its hard drives and QuickBook files”.

DESI Got Your Input, and Here It Is: eDiscovery Trends

By : Doug Austin

Back in January, we discussed the Discovery of Electronically Stored Information (DESI, not to be confused with Desi Arnaz, pictured above) workshop and its call for papers describing research or practice for the DESI VI workshop that was held last week at the University of San Diego as part of the 15th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence & Law (ICAIL 2015). Now, links to those papers are available on their web site.

Court Resolves Dispute Over Scope of Databases and Searches to be Performed: eDiscovery Case Law

By : Doug Austin

In Willett, et al. v. Redflex Traffic Systems, Inc., New Mexico District Judge Lourdes A. Martinez ordered the defendants to produce a spreadsheet referred of file folders, with information for the files on their virtual server(s), the plaintiffs to provide the defendant with a reasonable list of search terms, limited to the relevant time frame, parties, and issues of this case and for the defendants to perform the searches specified by the plaintiffs within ten days of receiving the searches.

When Collecting Emails, Make Sure You Have a Complete Outlook: eDiscovery Best Practices

By : Doug Austin

Most discovery requests include a request for emails of parties involved in the case. Email data is often the best resource for establishing a timeline of communications in the case and Microsoft® Outlook is the most common email program used in business today. Outlook emails can be stored in several different forms, so it’s important to be able to account for each file format when collecting emails that may be responsive to the discovery request.

Want to Save Review Costs? Be the Master of Your Domain(s): eDiscovery Best Practices

By : Doug Austin

Yesterday, we discussed how some BigLaw firms mark-up reviewer billing rates two to three times (or more) when billing their clients. But, even if that’s not the case, review is still by far the most expensive phase of eDiscovery. One way to minimize those costs is to identify documents that need little or no review and domain categorization can help in identifying those documents.

Tired of the “Crap”, Court Sanctions Investors and Lawyers for Several Instances of Spoliation: eDiscovery Case Law

By : Doug Austin

In Clear-View Technologies, Inc., v. Rasnick et al, California Magistrate Judge Paul S. Grewal sanctioned the defendants $212,320 and also granted a permissive adverse jury instruction that allows the presumption that the defendants' spoliated documents due to a series of “transgressions” by the defendants and their prior counsel.

For Better Document Review, You Need to Approach a ZEN State: eDiscovery Best Practices

By : Doug Austin

Among the many definitions of the word “zen”, the Urban Dictionary provides perhaps the most appropriate (non-religious) definition of the word, as follows: a total state of focus that incorporates a total togetherness of body and mind. However, when it comes to document review, a new web site by eDiscovery thought leader Ralph Losey may change your way of thinking about the word “ZEN”.

You Should Check the Level of Your Fuzzy When Searching: eDiscovery Best Practices

By : Doug Austin

If the title seems odd, let me clarify. I’m talking about “fuzzy” searching, which is a mechanism by finding alternate words that are close in spelling to the word you're looking for. Fuzzy searching will expand your search recall, but too much “fuzzy” will leave you reviewing a lot of non-responsive hits.

Court Agrees with Plaintiffs, Orders Provision for Qualitative Sampling of Disputed Search Terms: eDiscovery Case Law

By : Doug Austin

In the case In Re: Lithium Ion Batteries Antitrust Litigation, California Magistrate Judge Donna M. Ryu ordered the defendants to comply with the plaintiffs’ proposed qualitative sampling process for keyword search terms, citing DaSilva Moore that keywords “often are overinclusive”.

Judge Peck Wades Back into the TAR Pits with ‘Da Silva Moore Revisited': eDiscovery Case Law

By : Doug Austin

In Rio Tinto Plc v. Vale S.A., New York Magistrate Judge Andrew J. Peck approved the proposed protocol for technology assisted review (TAR) presented by the parties, but made it clear to note that “the Court's approval ‘does not mean. . . that the exact ESI protocol approved here will be appropriate in all [or any] future cases that utilize [TAR].’”

Court Rules on Dispute about Search Terms and Organization of Produced Documents: eDiscovery Case Law

By : Doug Austin

In Lutzeier v. Citigroup Inc., Missouri District Judge Ronnie I. White ruled on two motions to compel discovery by the plaintiff, addressing (among other things) disagreement on search terms to be used by the defendant and lack of organization and labeling of the defendant’s production to date.

Information Governance vs. Search Doesn’t Have to Be a Battle After All: eDiscovery Trends

By : Doug Austin

As will soon be reinforced in our upcoming thought leader interviews, one of the major focus areas at this year’s LegalTech® New York 2015 (LTNY) was a continued emphasis on Information Governance (IG). One of our perennial interviewees, Ralph Losey, has some thoughts about the battle in the legal tech world between IG and Search and reveals that it doesn’t have to be a battle after all.

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About the Bloggers

Brad Jenkins

Brad Jenkins, President and CEO of CloudNine Discovery, has over 20 years of experience leading customer focused companies in the litigation support arena. Brad has authored many articles on litigation support issues, and has spoken before national audiences on document management practices and solutions.

Doug Austin

Doug Austin, Professional Services Manager for CloudNine Discovery, has over 20 years experience providing legal technology consulting and technical project management services to numerous commercial and government clients. Doug has also authored several articles on eDiscovery best practices.

Jane Gennarelli

Jane Gennarelli is a principal of Magellan’s Law Corporation and has been assisting litigators in effectively handling discovery materials for over 30 years. She authored the company’s Best Practices in a Box™ content product and assists firms in applying technology to document handling tasks. She is a known expert and often does webinars and presentations for litigation support professionals around the country. Jane can be reached by email at jane@litigationbestpractices.com.